R Journal July Issue

As the current Editor-in-Chief of the R Journal, I must apologize for the delay in getting the July issue online, due to technical and other matters. In the meantime, though, please take a look at the many interesting articles slated for publication in this and upcoming issues.

Various improvements in technical documentation, as well as the pending hire of the journal’s first-ever editorial assistant, should shorten the review and publication processes in the future.

By the way, I’ve made a couple of tweaks to the Instructions for Authors. First, I note that the journal’s production software really does require following the instructions carefully. For instance, the \author field in your .tex file must start with “by” in order to work properly; it’s not merely a matter of, say, aesthetics. And your submission package must not have more than one .bib file or more than one .tex file other than RJwrapper.tex.

Finally, a reminder to those whom we ask to review article submissions: Your service would be greatly appreciated, a valuable contribution to R. If you must decline, though, please respond to our e-mail query, stating so, so that we may quickly search for other possible reviewers.

Prob/Stat for Data Sci: Math + R + Data

My new book, Probability and Statistics for Data Science: Math + R + Data, pub. by the CRC Press, was released on June 24!

This book arose from an open-source text I wrote and have been teaching from. The open source version will still be available, though rather different from the published one.

This is a math stat book, but different from all others, as the subtitle states: Math + R + Data. Even the topic ordering is rather different, with a goal of bringing in data science-relevant material as early as possible.

I’ve placed an excerpt from the book at http://tinyurl.com/y6hf7x66. I believe it epitomizes the intent and style of the book. Also, I’ve placed the front matter at http://tinyurl.com/yy9hx6db 

r/finance, 1 year later

The prominent conference R/Finance, held annually in Chicago, had a great program yesterday and today. As I wrote following last year’s conference, the organizers were criticized for including no women in its speaker lineup. The problem was that no women had submitted papers for consideration; no input, thus no output.

I’m a member of the Editorial Board of the R Journal, and out of curiosity, yesterday I did a gender count among papers I reviewed during my first two years of service, 2017 and 2018. I considered only first-author status, and found that I had accepted 54% of the papers by men, and 67% of those by women. That seems good, but only 20% of these papers were by women. I’m sure the numbers for my fellow board members were similar, and indeed for other journals in data science. For instance, in the current issue of the Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics, only 3 of 18 paper have women as first authors.

Thus I felt that the activists’ criticisms last year were unfair. Not only had there been no submissions by women, hence no women speakers, but also the conference organizers quickly made amends when the problem was pointed out. They quickly arranged a special talk by a woman who had presented in a previous year, and also made room in the schedule for a talk by R Ladies on improving conditions for women in conferences. They promised to be proactive in encouraging women to submit papers this year.

The organizers did take strong proactive measures to improve things this year, and the results were highly impressive. There were 12 women presenters by my count out of 50-something, including an excellent keynote by Prof. Genevera Allen of Rice University. In addition, there were two women on the Program Committee.

We all know that finance is a male-dominated field.  Thus it is not too surprising that the conference received no submissions by women last year (though, as noted, they had had women speakers in the past).  But they are to be highly commended for turning things around, and indeed should serve as a model.